Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, The 30 Day Vegan Challenge Book

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We spoke with Colleen Patrick-Goudreau on 2/17/2010 and this older interview can be heard here

 

11/9/2011:

Colleen Patrick-Goudreau
The 30 Day Vegan Challenge

The award-winning author of five books, including the bestselling The Joy of Vegan Baking, The Vegan Table, Color Me Vegan, Vegan’s Daily Companion, and The 30-Day Vegan Challenge, Colleen Patrick-Goudreau has guided people to becoming and staying vegan for over 12 years through sold-out cooking classes, bestselling books, inspiring lectures, engaging videos, and her immensely popular audio podcast, “Vegetarian Food for Thought.” Using her unique blend of passion, humor, and common sense, she empowers and inspires people to live according to their own values of compassion and wellness. She also contributes to National Public Radio and The Christian Science Monitor, and has appeared on The Food Network and PBS. Visit colleenpatrickgoudreau.com for more.

TRANSCRIPTION:

CARYN:
Hello, we’re back. I’m Caryn Hartglass and you’re listening to It’s All about Food. And we’re going to continue with my favorite subject: food.

And bring on the next guest, and that is Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, and we’re going to be talking about her newest book: The 30-Day Vegan Challenge. She’s an award-winning author of five books, including the best-selling Joy of Vegan Baking, The Vegan Table, Color Me Vegan, Vegan’s Daily Companion, and now the 30-Day Vegan Challenge. She has guided people to becoming and staying vegan for over 12 years through sold-out cooking classes, best-selling books, inspiring lectures, engaging videos, and her immensely popular audio podcasts: Vegetarian Food for Thought.

Using her unique blend of passion, humor, and common sense, she empowers and inspires people to live according to their own values of compassion and wellness. She also contributes to National Public Radio and the Christian Science Monitor and has appeared on the Food Network and PBS. Visit ColleenPatrickGoudreau.com for more.

Hello, and welcome to It’s All about Food, Colleen.

COLLEEN:
Hi Caryn, thank you for having me. It’s good to talk you again.

CARYN:
Yeah, it’s good to talk to you. And thank you for the book. I got it, and I read it, and I’m ready to talk about it.

COLLEEN:
Oh, great, thank you.

CARYN:
First, I didn’t realize what it was going to be. And I thought it was just going to be a cookbook, and there are many, many wonderful recipes in here, but there is a whole lot more. And you basically talk about everything people need to know.

COLLEEN:
Yeah, it’s wonderful. It’s actually really wonderful because this is a culmination of eleven years of my work. And you know, it was just published in August, and I wrote it a year ago, and it answers everything that I know people ask, and so when people come up to me now, I just saw a woman yesterday in a store, she said, “I know, but what about eating out?” and I said–

CARYN:
Read the book.

COLLEEN:
“What about traveling?” and it’s in the book. Nothing you ask is unique. Nothing you ask hasn’t been asked before. So that’s what’s really exciting about it. It really covers every question people ask about this lifestyle.

CARYN:
That’s funny that nothing people ask is really unique We’ve heard all these questions over and over, the funny thing is I kind of got a sore neck reading this book cause I just kept nodding. Yes, yes, yes, yes, oh yeah, uh-huh, right. [laughs]

COLLEEN:
Yup.

CARYN:
But that’s great, that it’s all here. And uh, it’s um, It’s really a good guide because, okay, you touch on some of the serious stuff–the nutrition, whatever–but it’s really just common sense things that help people through this change.

COLLEEN:
Yeah, I really tried to make this as easy as possible. I mean, the reason the book exists is because I realized that making changes is actually hard for people. That’s whether you’re becoming vegan or doing anything. The change is difficult for people. And so as much as that I can guide people and help them change habit, there are some things that I, you know, people need help with. Once you get past that, then it’s just a matter of creating new habits and kind of looking in a different direction, and that’s really what I do: I say, “Look, you’re going to be changing some of the foundation that’s been familiar to you for many, many years. But the good news is we’re gonna be replacing that with a new foundation so I’m gonna give you everything you need so that when you’re done, you’re standing on firm ground. You’re not flailing about, and I think that’s been a real problem with people, I think there’s a lot of people who are compelled to make these changes and become vegan for so many reasons, but they don’t know how to do it, and that’s really how I see my work, is that it helps people, it’s a guide for people, and that’s what this book is.

CARYN:
Now, it’s a 30-day vegan challenge, and the way you set it up is there’s a different chapter for every day. And, my– I would recommend to people if they were making a transition to the vegan diet I would read this whole book first, and then go back and read it a chapter a day. While they’re doing it.

COLLEEN:
It’s true. It’s interesting, isn’t it? It’s very much more than meant to be programmatic. My intention from the very beginning was not, “Look, day one you do this, day two you do this, day three you do this, and by the end of the 30-day you’re vegan.” This was, “Do it for 30 days, just commit to doing it for 30 days, and the book will give you everything you need and I suspect that they’re gonna read ahead cause you’re gonna want to know what to do the next day. You’re gonna want all the information to then– then do it for 30 days. And the keep looking back to it as a resource guide. But I think that’s what a lot of people are doing: reading it all at once.

CARYN:
Right. No, I think that’s the best way to do it, and then know, as you’re doing it. “Oh, I remember reading that, let me go and check up on that.”

COLLEEN:
Good, yeah, exactly. And there’s so many things that people can use: to take it to the store with them because, you know, I mean there’s a whole chapter on just, as you know, stocking your pantries and produces–lists and lists and lists of items that people would want to put on their shopping list, and, you know, recipes so they can go to the grocery store with the book and have a shopping list. I mean, so there’s a lot of resources to use again and again.

CARYN:
Now you’ve been doing this for eleven, twelve years. How long have you been vegan?

COLLEEN:
For twelve years.

CARYN:
Oh. Okay.

COLLEEN:
For twelve years. I started right away. [laughs]

CARYN:
So you haven’t been into this for that long, because I mean some of us have been doing this for decades, and right now it’s really exciting, because it seems like this is our time. People know what the word is: vegan. for the most part know how to pronounce it: vegan. [laughs] And– sometimes some people say “vay-guhn” but that’s okay. But we’re on television now, and if you read the New York Times, but every Sunday it’s so exciting because now I see three vegan books on the New York’s Times’ how-to best-selling list. We have Forks Over Knives, we have Eat to Live, and I just saw Dr. Caldwell’s Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease, and this is so exciting.

COLLEEN:
This is very exciting, absolutely.

CARYN:
So people need to know how to do it, because people are talking about it.

COLLEEN:
Right. Right, exactly. And that’s, again, that’s what happens is what I talk to a lot of people who read those books, or seen films, and they all have the same reaction: they want to do it, but they still ask the same questions–they all ask the same questions. So that’s what this is, that’s the why, and this is the how.

CARYN:
You talk about a lot of interesting things in here, and I don’t remember exactly where it was, but it had to do with where we’ve come as a civilization in terms of food. And you know there’s a lot of people that say, you know, humans weren’t meant to eat this way, you know, we’re meant to– and I certainly don’t agree with that, and I think we’re really evolving. We’re eating all different kinds of ways, and cultures have eaten all different kinds of ways, and I think we’re really just learning now about what’s best for humans in terms of disease and longevity and just feeling good.

COLLEEN:
I think it’s true. I think in terms of real optimal nutrition I think we’re really learning more now than we ever did before. But I think we’ve known for a long time what food really are the most helpful for us, and it got away from us as we became more affluent as our society became more affluent. We had access to things we never had access to before, which isn’t necessarily a good thing. Cause bringing all of these things into our diet has actually caused a lot of problems. So no, of course we’re learning more today, which is really good. That’s where I am. Let’s look forward, not look backward, and I think the excuses that people make, those statements about “But this is how we’ve always eaten,” “But this is how we evolved, “But this is what we did 10,000 years ago.”

I don’t care what we did 10,000 years ago. That doesn’t interest me. What interests me is how well we can do today, and how well we can do in the future. And, you know, I just find, Caryn, what I love about the response I get to that, is that it empowers people. I think we’ve kept the bar too low for too long. You hear, even, you know I’ve heard even vegan educators that are vegan activists say, “Well, people aren’t going to do it all so we might as well just expect them to do only this much.” I’m like, what are you talking about? People can do a lot more than you expect of them and I think we need to raise the bar. And when you do raise the bar people rise immediately and it’s a beautiful thing. They realize they can do things they perhaps never thought they could themselves.

CARYN:
I’m going to say amen to that, I really agree on raising the bar for so many things. So often when– the times I’m in a doctor’s office and I’m talking about nutrition, and ask them why aren’t you telling me this, and they say, “Well, you know, we do say it, but most people, you know, they don’t want to get there… and,” But if the doctor– if everyone raises the bar and says, “This is what you need to do,” people will meet that challenge.

COLLEEN:
They will meet the challenge, and I’ll tell you, they’re looking for it. They want it, they want the truth. People want to know what they can do to be the most– the healthiest they can be. They want to be the best people they can be. They want to be the most compassionate, and we’re really selling them short, and we’re not doing them any favors by just saying, “Oh, well, you’re not gonna– you’re not gonna do it so I’m just gonna give you the lowest amount of information, you know, the least amount of information, so that you can make the least number of changes so that you’re not uncomfortable”? I mean, that’s just so, that’s just underestimating them so much.

CARYN:
Well, yeah, part of it is when people are told how important good nutrition is, they don’t believe it. I know some people that just say [unclear] information, certainly for me, over and over, but they’re still kind of on the fence because they don’t see enough, they don’t hear enough, there’s so so much garbage out there.

COLLEEN:
It’s true, and if you notice– if you find the book on the– in the chapters on nutrition. You know, one of the things I really emphasize is that this is not that complicated and you don’t have to be, you know, a nutritionist, or a registered dietician or a doctor to understand this stuff. Or a chemist. It’s pretty basic stuff. And so the approach I take is don’t even listen to me. You don’t even have to believe me, but let’s look at common sense. The common sense is that calcium is a mineral found in the ground, and the reason cow’s milk has calcium in it is because the cow eats grass. You know, the omega 3 fatty acid that we find in fish is because the fish are eating the phytoplankton, they’re eating the algae, they’re eating the plant. So my whole point is that I get to be at the place of– the nutrients we need are plant-based, period.

You don’t have to believe me, but just start thinking about it. What we’re doing right now is going through the animal to get to the plants that the animals are eating themselves to get the nutrients we’re trying to get that originated in the plant. So when you touch it that way, people go, “I never thought about that before,” or “I never thought of that” and that’s the kind of thing that I hope to do, is just, you know, kind of shift paradigm for people so that they don’t have to think, like, “Yeah, but how many grams, and how many milligrams, and how many– you don’t have to measure away. You just have to understand the basic idea, that the nutrients are in the plants, and when we base our diet on plants we’re getting the most nutrients.

CARYN:
It’s not complicated. It’s easy and it’s delicious.

COLLEEN:
Yes.

CARYN:
Another thing I like in the book, I use this from time to time, or I’ll ask people, “You know, you drink cow’s milk?” How would you like a cold glass of dog’s milk?” And, uh, you have a great chapter on this, and, uh, you’ve added to it something that I didn’t think of, and that is that the animal that we’ve used for milk are the ones that don’t run away or don’t fight with us.

COLLEEN:
Yeah. And I make that point because I want people to understand how arbitrary the decision is. For us to consume– the ones who are consuming the milk of the animal– the milk that we’re consuming– the cow’s milk, you know, the goat’s milk, and in different parts of the world, they do consume buffalo’s milk, and, you know, yak’s milk and camel’s milk. And when you look at what all these animals share is that they’re herd animals and they’re easy to control and easy to keep together. So it’s the characteristic of the animal, not the characteristic of the milk, that makes– that have made us drink their milk for so long. If we could have controlled hyenas, if we could have controlled lions, we would have. It had nothing to do with the milk itself, it had everything to do with the animals that, you know, we could control.

CARYN:
Right. That’s pretty brilliant.

COLLEEN:
Thank you. [laughs] That’s– That’s– Again, the idea is that’s how arbitrary this is. And we don’t even drink our own human milk into adulthood. The animal whose milk we’re drinking, they’re not even drinking their own species’ milk in adulthood. It doesn’t make any sense. We’ve just all been, you know, we’ve all had the same marketing material from, you know, when we were so young that this was just embedded in our brains, but when you just phrase it a certain way it’s pretty amazing to watch people’s lapels go off when you say something like that and they go, “Oh my God, I’ve never thought about that before.”

CARYN:
One of the reasons why I thought it was important to read this book in its entirety before going off and doing the 30 days is what happens when you have to go out and talk to people about what you’re doing and the responses that you get, because a lot of people get intimidated, a lot of people get asked a lot of questions… you address a lot of them in this book.

COLLEEN:
So much pressure. Yeah, I mean, it’s– I talk about the social affects a lot because I think that’s very, very important, not only for us to be able to speak our truth and stand up for what we believe in and be able to feel confident and unapologetic about something that’s so powerful and so positive. But also because, you know, I do think we have a responsibility to be able to plant seeds when we’re talking to other people, and again, I think in the past, too long, vegetarians and vegans have felt intimidated doing this because they thought they were imposing their beliefs on someone when really it’s a done– in the right way it’s about sharing the truth, and that’s not something we have to apologize for and frankly it’s not something we can afford not to do. So I talk a lot about the social aspects and being able to answer those questions and feel really confident doing it.

CARYN:
Well, a lot of people having a real hard time with it. I know that there are some of us who don’t care what people think and can be really aggressive and just demand, and be upfront. But many people are not, and they need answers, they need scripted responses for the questions. And as you know, most of the questions, all of the questions we’ve heard before. So–

COLLEEN:
We’ve heard before, exactly. And I think what happens is, people who heard them, I think what happens is that we forget what we once were. I think we forget that we probably asked those questions to, and when we forget, that means when someone comes to us with these questions, “Oh my God I’ve had that same answer– same question– protein again, I’m so sick of it,” but you know, it’s the first time that person may be asking that question–

CARYN:
–thinking about it. Yeah.

COLLEEN:
Wait. And so you have to treat every person and every question as unique because it is. Because that’s the first time you’re actually having that conversation with that person. And the [unclear] is unique experience that we have to just kind of get out of our own way and really do a service to the truth by answering those questions even if we’ve been asked them a thousand times.

CARYN:
Where’s a unique place in our culture right now where we have a number of different problems in resecting our nutrition. One is, especially since World War II, when all these industrialized chemical manufacturing came into place we’re creating things and putting them in boxes and feeding them to people and calling them to food [laughs] and they’re not really food. Why are junk food, a lot of highly processed food, and we’re seeing this taking a toll on health. And the other part os that is as the population grows–we just reached seven billion recently, congratulations–if that we’re confining animals into this sopho– horrific spaces in order to grow more of them to see people there’s– two things are happening at the same time and they’re both not healthy.

COLLEEN:
Right.

CARYN:
And the– have a lot of bad impact on us, and you know, so when people– getting back to that subject where people talk about eating the way we’re supposed to eat or nature intended, I mean, we’re so far away from that.

COLLEEN:
For sure.

CARYN:
Not even talking about being vegetarian.

COLLEEN:
For sure. We are. Absolutely. And that’s what’s so lovely about being able to, you know, espouse this. We’re talking about whole food, we’re talking about, you know, whole grain, and vegetables and fruits, and nuts, and mushrooms, and beans, and herbs, and spices. These are not unfamiliar food, these are whole food. And it’s good food, it is nature’s food, and that’s, you know, we can get back to those kinds of basics, it’s really– its the best thing for everybody.

CARYN:
I know there’s a lot of people that listen to the show that are not vegan and are transitioning and having the classic struggles. So, one of the things is that people don’t even realize how many foods they eat that are vegan. It’s not the strange thing: vegan food. Oh, you’re serving vegan food. So what are some of the simple meals that people make that can easily be vegan?

COLLEEN:
Yeah, I talk about that too, I love that. Cause I, you know, if you’ve had an apple, you’ve had vegan food, we just don’t call it vegan. We don’t say, “Can I have a vegan apple?” or just have a vegan banana or– this is food, it’s just–

CARYN:
That’s actually given me a scary food that maybe genetically modified apples will soon have animal genes in them. Who knows what’s going on?

COLLEEN:

Let’s not go there. [laughs] Let’s just– by nature, apple is vegan, by nature, you know, banana is vegan. Yeah, I mean, that’s exactly what I do, Caryn, as well, is demystify it–it’s not a separate food group. You know, look in your cupboard, that’s one of the first things we do in the early part of the book. It’s just let’s look at the pantry and even before you go to the grocery store I suspect that you’re gonna have some things in your cupboard, in your refrigerator, in the freezer that are already vegan that you can prepare before you. Get to the grocery store and start buying some new things. I mean, there’ll be obvious things, like pasta, and like pasta sauce, some of which have chicken sauce, it’s true, but, you know, most are vegan.

As you’re getting to the most whole version of that tomato sauce, even if you buy it commercially, you’re getting to the most vegan as well, because it’s just, you know, tomatoes and citric acid as a preservative, and some garlic, and, you know, onion, et cetera. I mean, you’re getting pretty basic things. You’re not looking for the corn syrup and obviously the chicken stock. But you know for the most part, it’s vegan.

And then, you know, when you’re doing what I often encourage people to get greens as much as possible so I serve chard or kale, or even the pasta sauce that I’m making. Just for pasta. But it could be just basic things like, you know, some canned beans. Open them up and drain them, and then wrap them up in a tortilla, and put some guacamole on, and put some salsa on, some onion, and tomatoes, you know again, all the things that you’re already eating. It could be as simple as a peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwich. I mean, it’s amazing that I, you know, I’m sure you hear this too: people say, “Oh, peanut butter? Is peanut butter vegan?”

CARYN:
Uh-huh.

COLLEEN:
Peanut butter is peanuts. It’s ground. I mean that’s what they’re supposed to be.

CARYN:
Okay, I have a thing about peanuts, because our standard, generic–well, not generic–but the big brand of peanut butter do not just have peanuts. Peanut butter should just be peanuts. Some people have a little salt, but it should be just peanuts. It shouldn’t be hydrogenated oil and sugar and twenty-five other things in your peanut butter.

COLLEEN:
Amen

CARYN:
I have a bug about that.

COLLEEN:
Oh, I do too. I do the same feel– I do the same thing because peanut is ground–peanut butter is ground peanuts, that’s all it is. And I remember, though, I remember transitioning. I grew up on Jiffy and Skippy and… Biffy, whatever it was

CARYN:
And Jiff. Choosy mothers choose Jiff.

COLLEEN:
Right, exactly, I mean I remember that. And I know friends, you know, who eat a pretty healthful vegan diet still– or are still used to that sugary, kind of creamy peanut butter, and I just can’t take it. But I’ll save it for– to make our point here. That’s really a good example of how your palate changes. So when you’re going from a processed food, animal-based product diet to a whole-food, plant-based diet, your palate really changes, and that’s what’s really exciting after 30 days. You’ll discover that even after 30 days. It doesn’t take very long. So the things you think you can never live without now, I promise you, you stop craving because you get all that fat and salt out of your palate, out of your diet, and you start actually craving things that you would never thought you would crave. I never thought I’d crave kale every day. I didn’t grow up eating kale. Right? I mean, that’s not what I imagined, and that’s what happened. And my diet continues to improve. It’s very exciting, it’s a journey, there’s still more to do. But you really have to give yourself time to experience the benefits of getting all the animal product of your diet.

CARYN:
Eggs. Let’s just talk about eggs for a minute. Now I like that you mention in here that eggs are in some recipes and they’re totally useless.

COLLEEN:
Yeah, yes. We mentioned World War II, and that’s a perfect example… you know, before then people were baking eggs– baking cakes without eggs. it was kind of part of the–

CARYN:
Normal.

COLLEEN:
Exactly. And especially during the war when animal products were a luxury item, and really they still are–if we didn’t subsidize them people wouldn’t be able to afford to consume as many animal products as they do–but so people were definitely baking eggs during the war and during the depression, and then after World War II when we had more money than we knew what to do with we just started putting animal product really in everything–commercial products–because we could. You know, because we could afford it, and it was a symbol of affluence. And so it kind of stuck, and so then people got into our cultural consciousness that you can’t live without eggs.

CARYN:
[laughs]

COLLEEN:
That’s again, I try to demystify it and say, “Let’s take a look at this. What do you really need to bake?” Well, you need fat, you need moisture, you need leavening. You don’t need animal products. They serve those roles but plant-based food also serves those roles. So obviously, you know, baking soda and baking powder does that of the leaveners– I mean, you get your richness, I mean, you know, you get your richness from oil–plant-based oil–but when you’re baking a cake, and if I’m baking a cake for special occasions I am gonna do a nice, you know, fluffy cake with oil and–

CARYN:
Uh-huh

COLLEEN:
It’s a rich desert–

CARYN:
It’s a treat.

COLLEEN:
It’s a treat. And then you’re getting the moisture from the oil–could be a plant-based milk, could be water–whatever you’re adding to that recipe. So you absolutely don’t need eggs, they’re totally purposeless in many cases and so even when people are experimenting, baking without eggs, just try removing them. They’re not the one providing the leavener, they’re providing fat.

CARYN:
Uh-huh. Amen. And then the other thing is of course is cheese. You have a great recipe in here for creamy macaroni-and-cheese, one of the old time favorite comfort food and kids love macaroni and cheese, and this is one that’s… well everyone would like.

COLLEEN:
It’s so good. And I have to credit Ann Gentry, it’s from her Real Food Daily Cookbook originally, I modify it a slight amount. But it’s just so delicious–it’s based on cashews, with cashews, and misos–you’ve got that really wonderful tangy flavor, and, you know, there’s a whole chapter of, you know, called “Life after–” “There Is Life after Cheese,” it’s called, and… And I talk about, you know, what it says for us physically. Cause there’s a certain mouth feel, there’s a certain tanginess, there’s a certain salt, there’s an amount of fat–that’s what cheese does for us, dairy-based cheese. It’s not the cow’s milk. That’s now what we’re so excited about, it’s the fat and the salt.

And so we can, again, achieve that, creamy mouth feel–or what you’re talking about with this comfort food, macaroni and cheese–we can achieve that with plants. But I also spend a fair amount of time, as you know, in that chapter talking about just the emotional response we have to food. Because a lot of it is attachment to memory that we had, just attached to having grown up that way, and when we left it was some of those things. I think our transition becomes a lot easier because we’re not so attached to what that thing symbolizes. We can celebrate the memory without having the dairy-based cheese. But it’s the memory that means more to us than the cheddar cheese, really.

CARYN:
Right. Well, change is… I think it’s what humanity is all about. We are continually changing, continually evolving, and I really have hope for, as a species, to really become something truly incredible. But we’re really in a big transition right now. And we. you know, we’re focusing our time and our money on so many things that are a waste in my mind. You know, I think if people were eating healthy food and eating a healthy diet we wouldn’t have the chronic diseases that we have today: heart disease, diabetes, many cancers, autoimmune diseases, etc. And all those research scholars that go, “To finding cures for these things that we know how to prevent could really be used for so much more.”

COLLEEN:
Yeah. Amen. [laughs]

CARYN:
So I know I hope for that.

COLLEEN:
I hope for that, too.

CARYN:
So. What are some of– Are there like Colleen Patrick-Goudreau’s favorite recipes–?

COLLEEN:
Sure.

CARYN:
–that people tell you, “Oh my God, this is my most favorite recipe”?

COLLEEN:
Yeah, there are. Some of them are in the book there. In fact, a lot of them are in the book. So one of them is the Garlic Green Soup. So again, I was talking about kale, and I’m sure your cooking skills are sophisticated enough to try that recipe. Well, I find exciting are those people who, you know, never had kelp before. And they make that recipe and they cannot believe it. They just cannot believe how tasty it is, how comforting, how healing it is. So the Garlic Green Soup is definitely an absolute favorite of many, many people. And there’s even a video demonstration of it on my website. I’m Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, and if people can’t spell that, it’s CompassionateCook.com. Cause I know it’s an annoying–

CARYN:
Annoying.

COLLEEN:
–hyphenated name. But also No Queso Quesadillas. Those are so fabulous people love those, they serve them to their kids, they make the as a snack, make them as a party appetizer or dinner. And that’s just quesadillas, which are made of tortillas: corn, or wheat; and hummus. And you can fill them with whatever you want. When you warm these tortillas on the stove the hummus becomes totally different

CARYN:
Warm, and gooey, and yummy.

COLLEEN:
Exactly. So those are the two that stand out.

CARYN:
Yeah, that’s great. Okay, well, guess what? We’ve come to the end and I’m starving. So I’m [laughs] I’m getting some yummy vegan food. Thanks, Colleen, thanks for writing this book: The 30-Day Vegan Challenge. And again, you’re– you’ve got a lot of websites, but the easiest one to remember is…

COLLEEN:
CompassionateCook.com.

CARYN:
CompassionateCook.com. Thank you.

COLLEEN:
Thank you, Caryn. Take care.

CARYN:
You too. Bye bye.

I’m Caryn Hartglass. You’ve been listening to It’s All about Food, and please check out ResponsibleEatingandLiving.com, and if you’re on Facebook please like us: Responsible Eating and Living. Okay, thank you very much for joining me and next week we have a very fond hour with Dr. Michael Gregor. So join us. And have a delicious week.

Transcribed by Monika Ayu, May 24, 2013

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  1 comment for “Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, The 30 Day Vegan Challenge Book

  1. November 22, 2011 at 3:59 am

    I so enjoyed this talk with Colleen Patrick-Goudreau and all the GEMS throughout the talk. Thank you SO Much
    Peace & Veggies, Marina :)

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